1 It’s recommended for both female dogs and cats to be spayed (i.e. “fixed”) before going into heat.
True
Correct! The Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) recommends dogs and cats be spayed (or “fixed”) before going into their first heat, which typically occurs around 6 months of age. For female dogs, each heat cycle increases the risk of developing serious medical conditions such as an infection of the uterus or mammary cancer. Spaying does not change the personality of the pet but can reduce the risk of some health problems. The CVMA position statement regarding spaying and neutering cats and dogs can be found here.
False
Actually, the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) recommends dogs and cats be spayed (or “fixed”) before going into their first heat, which typically occurs around 6 months of age. For female dogs, each heat cycle increases the risk of developing serious medical conditions such as an infection of the uterus or mammary cancer. Spaying does not change the personality of the pet but can reduce the risk of some health problems. The CVMA position statement regarding spaying and neutering cats and dogs can be found here.
2 Cats scratch, pounce, and bite as a form of play.
True
Correct! The play behaviours of cats resemble their natural predatory behaviours including stalking, chasing, pouncing, and biting. Cats also like to play with items that they can pick up and throw into the air. The American Association of Feline Practitioners emphasizes the importance of owners not encouraging play and biting behaviours with their feet or hands. This can teach the cat that it is fun to stalk, pounce on, and bite their owner, leading to play-related aggression. If your cat or kitten scratches or bites your hands or feet in play, redirect their attention to an appropriate toy. Some appropriate toys for cats include wands, catnip-filled toys, and self-propelling toys that resemble prey.
False
Actually, this is true; the play behaviours of cats resemble their natural predatory behaviours including stalking, chasing, pouncing, and biting. Cats also like to play with items that they can pick up and throw into the air. The American Association of Feline Practitioners emphasizes the importance of owners not encouraging play and biting behaviours with their feet or hands. This can teach the cat that it is fun to stalk, pounce on, and bite their owner, leading to play-related aggression. If your cat or kitten scratches or bites your hands or feet in play, redirect their attention to an appropriate toy. Some appropriate toys for cats include wands, catnip-filled toys, and self-propelling toys that resemble prey.
3 Cats and dogs misbehave out of spite.
True
Actually, there are many reasons why an animal might create a mess or misbehave; it is important to understand that they are not acting out against you. Horowitz (2011) has shown that even dogs who have not misbehaved but are scolded will look guilty, sentencing themselves to an undeserved punishment. Understanding the primary reason is important because they may have underlying medical or behavioural problems that are treatable. Seeking professional advice when your animal appears to be misbehaving can be beneficial for both you and your dog. To learn more about choosing a reputable companion-animal behaviourist, go to this page.
False
Correct! There are many reasons why an animal might create a mess or behave undesirably; it is important to understand that they are not acting out against you. Horowitz (2011) has shown that even dogs who have not misbehaved but are scolded will look guilty, sentencing themselves to an undeserved punishment. Understanding the primary reason for the behaviour is important because the pet may have underlying medical or behavioural problems that are treatable. Seeking professional advice when your animal appears to be misbehaving can be beneficial for both you and your dog. To learn more about choosing a reputable companion-animal behaviourist, go to this page.
4 It costs less than $400 per year to maintain a cat.
True
Actually, according to the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) fee guidelines, it costs almost $400 for food and litter alone for a 10lb adult cat. There are many other things to consider in your annual costs for your cat; check out our ‘Budgeting for your pet’ page for more information.
False
Correct! According to the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA) fee guidelines, food and litter alone cost approximately $400 per year for a 10lb adult cat. There are many other things to consider in your annual costs for your cats; check out our ‘Budgeting for your pet’ page for more information.
5 There is a critical period for kittens to be exposed to a variety of people, animals and environments within the first three months of life.
True
Correct! Both Dr. Gary Landsberg and Dr. Sophia Yin, well-respected veterinary behaviourists, have said the critical socialization period for kittens is between 2 and 9 weeks. However, if you decide to adopt an adult cat, socialization is still possible. Socialization is important for ensuring your kitten or cat is comfortable in a variety of situations. It is important to know where you are getting your pet from and that the kitten or cat has been socialized properly before you adopt your pet. For more information, check out our “socialization” page.
False
Actually, there is a critical period of socialization for kittens. Both Dr. Gary Landsberg and Dr. Sophia Yin, well-respected veterinary behaviourists, have said the critical socialization period is between 2 and 9 weeks. if you decide to adopt an adult cat, socialization is still possible. Socialization is important for ensuring your kitten or cat is comfortable in a variety of situations. It is important to know where you are getting your pet from and that the kitten or cat has been socialized properly before you adopt your pet. For more information, check out our “socialization” page.
6 It’s important to gradually introduce new pets to existing pets.
True
Correct! The American Association of Feline Practitioners, the Ontario Veterinary Medical Association, as well as well-known veterinary behaviourists, such as Dr. Bonnie Beaver and Dr. Gary Landsberg, highly recommend introducing pets slowly to reduce the risk of fights and stress-related disorders, especially with cats. Stress can cause behavioural and medical conditions. It is important to try to ensure pets get along because research has found that when new and resident pets do not get along, it can negatively affect an owner’s relationship with both pets. Learn more at our *introducing pets page.
False
Actually, the American Association of Feline Practitioners, the Ontario Veterinary Medical Association, as well as well-known veterinary behaviourists, such as Dr. Bonnie Beaver and Dr. Gary Landsberg, highly recommend introducing new pets to resident pets slowly so that they do not get into fights or feel overly stressed from the experience. Stress can cause behavioural and medical conditions. It is important to try to ensure pets get along because research has found that when new and resident pets do not get along, it can negatively affect an owner’s relationship with both pets. For solutions, check out our *introducing pets page.
7 You only need one litter box per household, regardless of the number of cats.
True
Actually, having too few litter boxes for the number of cats in your household may be a contributing factor to inappropriate elimination, which may also be caused by behavioural or medical problems. There should be at least one litterbox per cat in the household. The American Association of Feline Practitioners actually suggests having one more litterbox than you have cats. So, for example, if you have two cats, it would be beneficial to have two to three litter boxes. This is important because cats like clean and private litter boxes. If the litter box is dirty or in an area that makes your cat uncomfortable they can find another litter box to do their business in. Medical and other behavioural conditions aside, this will lessen the risk of your cat inappropriately eliminating on other areas in your house.
False
Correct! Having too few litter boxes for the number of cats in your household may be a contributing factor to inappropriate elimination, which may also be caused by behavioural or medical problems. There should be at least one litterbox per cat in the household. The American Association of Feline Practitioners actually suggests having one more litterbox than you have cats. So, for example, if you have two cats, it would be beneficial to have two to three litter boxes. This is important because cats like clean and private litter boxes. If one litter box is dirty or in an area that makes your cat uncomfortable, they can find another litter box to do their business in.
8 Giving pets a reward is better for training a pet than punishment.
True
Correct! The American Veterinary Society of Animal Behaviour recommends reinforcing desired behaviours with positive rewards, such as giving treats or praising your pet for positive behaviour. In addition, it is important to remove anything causing or reinforcing inappropriate behaviours and if possible, fixing emotional and environmental conditions that might be causing unwanted behaviours. Check out their position statement on *approaches to reinforcing cat behaviour for more information.
False
Actually, there are many adverse problems that can arise from using punishment for training, such as fear aggression, inappropriate elimination, and destruction of property. The American Veterinary Society of Animal Behaviour recommends reinforcing desired behaviours with positive rewards, such as giving your pet a treat or praising your pet for positive behaviour. In addition, it is important to fix emotional and environmental causes of inappropriate behaviour if possible and remove anything that might be causing or reinforcing the undesirable behaviour. For more information, check out their position statement on *approaches to reinforcing cat behaviour.
9 Behaviour problems in pets can be a result of stressful events and/or changes to the pet's environment.
True
Correct! Landsberg, Hunthausen, and Ackerman (2003) state that changes in behaviour can be the result of stressful events and/or changes to the pet's environment, including changes in your daily routine (e.g., family member going on vacation). Your veterinarian can help you investigate your pet’s behavioural problems in order to rule out any medical problems. It is also very important to know the history leading up to the pet’s behavior changes to help figure out what events might have caused it. Finding a knowledgeable trainer/behaviourist to may also be helpful in treating behaviour problems. Check out the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior’s handout on *choosing a trainer. Your veterinarian will likely be able to refer you to some reputable trainers as well.
False
Actually, Landsberg, Hunthausen, and Ackerman (2003) state that changes in behaviour can be the result of stressful events and/or changes to the pet's environment, including changes in your daily routine (e.g., family members going on vacation). Your veterinarian can help investigate your pet’s behavioural problems in order to rule out any medical problems. It is also very important to know the history leading up to the pet’s behavior changes to help figure out what events might have caused it. Finding a knowledgeable trainer/behaviourist to may also be helpful in treating behaviour problems. Check out the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior’s handout on *choosing a trainer. Your veterinarian will likely be able to refer you to some reputable trainers as well.

ikili opsiyon nasıl yapılır American Association of Feline Practitioners. (2012). AAFP Position Statement: Early spay and castration. Retrieved from http://www.catvets.com/public/PDFs/PositionStatements/EarlySpay&Neuter.pdf

böcker om valutahandel American Association of Feline Practitioners. (2004). Feline behaviour guidelines from the American Association of Feline Practitioners. Retrieved fromhttp://www.catvets.com/public/PDFs/PracticeGuidelines/FelineBehaviorGLS.pdf

opciones binarias es bueno American Association of Feline Practitioners. (2014). Feline house-soiling: useful information for cat owners. Retrieved from http://www.catvets.com/public/PDFs/ClientBrochures/HouseSoiling-WebView.pdf

iq option binäre optionen am wochenende handeln American Association of Feline Practitioners and the Cornell Feline Health, Center, Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine. (2002). Feline behaviour problems: house soiling. Retrieved from http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/brochure_housesoiling.cfm

http://www.ivst-vz.de/?debin=bin%C3%A4re-optionen-mit-50-euro-einzahlung-iq-option binäre optionen mit 50 euro einzahlung iq option American Association of Feline Practitioners. (n.d.). Introducing a cat into the household. Retrieved from http://www.catvets.com/cat-owners/caring-for-cats/introducing-a-cat-kitten

www optionbit American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. (n.d.). Spay-neuter. Retrieved from http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/cat-care/spay-neuter

consigli investire in opzioni American Veterinary Medical Association. (n.d.). Introducing a second dog into the home. Retrieved from http://www.avmamedia.org/display.asp?sid=541&tid=207&NAME=introducing_a_second_dog_into_the_hom

opzioni binarie bonus no deposito American Veterinary Society of Animal Behaviour. (2007). AVSAB Position statement – the use of punishment for behaviour modification in animals. Retrieved from http://avsabonline.org/uploads/position_statements/Combined_Punishment_Statements1-25-13.pdf

Buy Tastylia (Tadalafil) Beaver, B. (1999). Canine behavior: a guide for veterinarians. Philadelphia, PA: W.B. Saunders Company.

opciones binarias legales Canadian Veterinary Medical Association. (2012). Neutering of dogs and cats (spay and castration) – position statement. Retrieved from http://www.canadianveterinarians.net/documents/dog-and-cat-spay-castration

opcje binarne godziny handlu Herron, M.E. and Buffington, C.A.T. (2010). Environmental enrichment for indoor cats. Compendium: Continuing Education for Veterinarians. Retrieved from http://indoorpet.osu.edu/assets/documents/Herron10_EE_for_Indoor_Cats.pdf

http://teen-spanking.com/?popka=opciones-binarias-de-acciones opciones binarias de acciones Horowitz, A. (2011). Do dogs feel guilty, proud, and jealous? Testing anthropomorphisms of the domestic dog. Proceedings from Gentle leader PABA: Exploring the dog’s mind. Guelph, ON: University of Guelph.

http://actioncooling.com/?kiko=taden-demokonto&9d0=7c taden demokonto Landsberg, G.M., Hunthausen, W.L., & Ackerman, L.J. (2003). Behaviour counseling and behavioural diagnostics. In J. Rodenhuis and Z. Youd (Eds.), Handbook of behaviour problems of the dog and cat.

broker expose Landsberg, G.M., Hunthausen, W.L., & Ackerman, L.J. (2012). Feline development: socialization period. In J. Rodenhuis and Z. Youd (Eds.), Behaviour Problems of the Dog and Cat (3rd Edition). Retrieved from http://books.google.ca/books?id=5rtQ8AazitAC&pg=PA15&lpg=PA15&dq=gary+landsberg+cat+socialization+period&source=bl&ots=0DaSJOCiVc&sig=bSCgDngX7uKt8_XiZvwDzfRyr40&hl=en&sa=X&ei=vSBRVLj3EYugyASD4oCYAg&ved=0CCkQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q=cat%20socialization%20period&f=false

forex öppettider göteborg nordstan Lifelearn. (2009). Kitten – introducing to a new home. Retrieved from http://www.hsmo.org/assets/behavior-handouts/feline/kittens-introducing-a-new-kitten-to-your-home.pdf

guadagna con il forex Lifelearn. (2014). Introducing a new dog to your family dog. In dog behaviour and training. Retrieved from http://www.hsmo.org/pet-training/introducing-a-new-dog-to-your.pdf

Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. (n.d.). Helping your adopted cat – and existing pets – to accept each other. Retrieved from http://www.ontariospca.ca/helping-your-adopted-cat-and-existing-pets-to-accept-each-other.html

Ontario Veterinary Medical Association. (2016). Cost of caring for an adult cat. Retrieved from https://www.ovma.org/pet-owners/pet-insurance/

Ontario Veterinary Medical Association. (2001). Welcome To The Family: A Cat Owner's Handbook. Retrieved from http://www.ovma.org.vsd20.korax.net/pet_owners/cats/welcome_cat.html

Yin, S. (2011). Kitten Socialization. Retrieved from http://drsophiayin.com/blog/entry/kitten-socialization